Sunday, December 21, 2008

Would you know what to do in this situation?

A friend of mine sent me an important e-mail about what to do in the event of a kitchen grease fire. As much of a worry-wart as I am, I guess I never gave much thought to how I'd handle such a situation. My first instinct would probably be to throw water on the grease fire. But after reading this e-mail and watching the short video (30 seconds), I learned a valuable lesson....DO NOT throw water on a grease fire!! The aftermath of what would happen sent chills down my spine, especially because, chances are, my children would be in the kitchen with me because there seems to be some silent rule that they all must hang on my legs while I cook meals. When I asked my husband what he would do in the event of a kitchen grease fire, he thought throwing water on it would be the correct way to put out the fire. I had him watch the video and he had the same reaction as I did.

The following information is what was included in the e-mail.....read this first and then watch the short video.

"I never realized that a wet dishcloth can be a one size fits all lid to cover a fire in a pan! This is a dramatic video (30-second, very short) about how to deal with a common kitchen fire... Oil in a frying pan. Read the following Introduction, then watch the show... It's a real eye-opener! At the Fire Fighting Training school they would demonstrate this with a deep fat fryer set on the fire field. An instructor, donned in a fire suit and using an 8 oz cup at the end of a 10 foot pole, would toss water onto a grease fire. The results got the attention of the students. The water, being heavier than oil, sinks to the bottom where it instantly becomes superheated. The explosive force of the steam blows the burning oil up and out. On the open field, it became a thirty foot high fireball that resembled a nuclear blast. Inside the confines of a kitchen, the fire ball hits the ceiling and fills the entire room. Also, do not throw sugar or flour on a grease fire. One cup of either creates the explosive force of two sticks of dynamite. This is a powerful message. Watch the video and don't forget what you see. Tell your whole family about this video. Or better yet, send this to them."


12 comments:

Lana said...

Wow. I have always heard to throw flour on a grease fire. I Hate dish rags. (I always use a scrub brush for my dishes). I seriously will be keeping dish rags handy now. Seriously. Thanks for sharing this.

Lana said...

Ok. A dish cloth for drying. THOSE I use!

Chatabox Girl said...

I was taught the Fire Triangle. A fire needs one of three things to survive, and grow. Oxygen, Heat and Fuel. (If you imagine these three words in the shape of a triangle) If you take one word out, the triangle collapses. And so too will the fire.

So the best way that will fix ANY fire, is to take away the oxygen. Cover it with something heavy and non flammable. This also helps to stop the fuel too I guess.

I haven’t watched the video yet (at work) but I assume this is the same kind of thing?

Fires can be so dangerous! Its good that videos like this are around!

trublubyu said...

so glad you stopped by my blog and spoke to me! come again anytime.

as for the grease fire, when i was 8 my 14 y.o. sister was babysitting us and we decided to make potato chips- because everyone makes those. we had a huge grease fire in the kitchen and our first instinct was to run outside and get snow to throw on the fire, so we did. my ohter sister was calling the neighbors to see what to do and they told us to put baking soda on it. and it went out. it was bad- but none of us were hurt.

and then we just had to explain it to mom and dad when they got home. this would make for a humorous post. maybe i'll post about it sommeday.

anyway- sorry to leave a comment novel...

Hajar said...

Thank you so much for sharing this video! I wouldn't have known that was the way to stop it either. I don't do much frying myself...but my husband does.

Creative Junkie said...

omg.

Thanks so much for this ... I had no idea.

AmberP said...

I would NEVER have known what to do... great video!!! I am a hugggggeeeeeee worry-wort too and have a huge fire phobia so this is important to know! (I agree about the kids hanging off leg silent rule dealio... what gives?!)

ParentingPink said...

Wow! Great advice. I always forget what to use on certain types of kitchen fires, so this is a great reminder!

Thanks for the tip & Happy Holidays!

ComfyMom~Stacey said...

I've had a few grease & other fires on my stove (because I am not so good at sauteing). I keep an industrial sized box of baking soda in the cabinet by the stove. It has the lid half ripped off. Just grab and dump.

Rebecca said...

That's crazy! Thanks for sharing!

mrsbear said...

I have seen the video before. My husband is a firefighter and he made me watch it a while back. The effect wasn't any less shocking watching it now. Good to know, really. I think most of us spend a majority of our day with children scurrying in the general vicinity. Scary stuff.

blueviolet said...

Thanks for posting this great reminder and I never thought of using a wet dishrag. That's so simple but so logical. Hopefully none of us will ever have to use it though.

I figure that if the children are alive when my husband gets home at the end of the day, I've done my job.

----Roseanne Barr



 
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